Wednesday, December 29, 2021

Nina Berman on WORT Radio "A Public Affair"

 Via WORT Radio, Madison, Wisconsin


This Thursday, 12/30 on WORT’s noontime ”A Public Affair”….

APA’s guest will be NINA BERMAN, the award-winning documentary photographer, filmmaker, author and educator. We’ll be discussing, among other topics, her recent film documentary, “When Jets Fly,” — a look at the impact on civilians living near airfields currently being used for Air Force training exercises from Whidbey Island, Washington to Burlington, Vermont, current site of a 20-plane squadron of F-35 attack jets.

Noon to 1:00 (Central), 12/30,  “A Public Affair” WORT 89.9fm, Madison. Listen online, live and archived at: https://www.wortfm.org/news-talk/talk/public-affair/


A Public Affair is WORT's daily hour long call-in talk program. It aims to engage listeners in a conversation on social, cultural, and political issues of importance. The guests range from local activists and scholars to notable national and international figures.


How to listen


Monday, December 27, 2021

First in a series: 2021 in 5 photos Features Ashley Gilbertson's January 6 Photograph of Eugen Goodman

 Via Axios AM

December 27, 2021

First in a series: 2021 in 5 photos

Capitol Police Officer Eugene Goodman stands firm as rioters push toward the Senate chamber during the Jan. 6 siege in the United States Capitol

Above: Capitol Police Officer Eugene Goodman stands firm as rioters push toward the Senate chamber during the Jan. 6 siege in the United States Capitol.

Why it matters: "Goodman’s selfless and quick-thinking actions doubtlessly saved lives and bought security personnel precious time to secure and ultimately evacuate the Senate before the armed mob breached the Chamber," the Senate said in awarding the Congressional Gold Medal to Goodman and others who protected the Capitol.

Tuesday, December 21, 2021

HOLIDAY HOURS

 

black and white photograph of snowy road in forest of pine trees
Henry Monroe   Snowy Trail, Arizona, 2021



  Holiday Hours 2021

Closing at 2pm Friday, Christmas Eve; Closed Saturday Christmas Day, open Sunday Dec 26 

Closing at 2pm Friday, New Year's Eve; Closed Saturday New Year's Day, open Sunday January 2 

Regular opening hours are 10-5 daily. "Tony Vaccaro at 99"continues on exhibition through January 16, 2022.


Thank you for your continued encouragement and support. We look forward to your visit to the Gallery, or please view our collection on line.


Wednesday, December 15, 2021

NY Times Year In Pictures Includes Ashley Gilbertson's January 6 Insurrection Photographs

 Via The New York Times

December 15, 2021

The Year In Pictures

While many people, fearing the virus, continued to stay close to home, photographers traveled the world, documenting turmoil and triumphs.

color photograph of Officer Goodman confronting rioters in the Capitol, Washington, DC, January 6, 2021

"For Ashley Gilbertson, this photograph captured the intensity of the moment when a single man stood firm against a massive mob overrunning the United States Capitol."

"As they turned a corner, the mob paused. A lone policeman was shouting at them to stop and turn back. Men in QAnon shirts shouted back, and another waved a Confederate flag in front of the officer. He drew his baton to fight them back, but it fell to the ground in the chaos. He unclipped the holster of his pistol and put his hand on the grip, and I put a rioter between me and him as a shield. But the officer never drew his sidearm.

His name, I would later learn, was Eugene Goodman. He acted as a diversion to draw rioters away from the Senate chamber. There weren’t many moments that we can be proud of as a nation from Jan. 6, 2021, but this is one of them."


Monday, December 13, 2021

Stream "Underfire: The Untold Story of PFC Tony Vaccaro"

 

Santa Fe, NM – On December 20, 2021, Tony Vaccaro celebrates his 99th birthday, an inspiration to us all.

To help celebrate, we are offering limited free streaming downloads of the HBO documentary "Underfire: The Untold Story of PFC Tony Vaccaro". The film chronicles the life of a man who played two roles during World War II, both at great risk: a combat infantryman on the front lines and a photographer who took and developed roughly 8,000 photographs of the war. Contact Monroe Gallery for details, offer is limited.

Born in Greensburg, Pennsylvania on December 20, 1922, Tony is one of the few people alive who can claim to have survived the Battle of Normandy and COVID-19. Tony Vaccaro spent the first years of his life in the village of Bonefro, Italy after becoming an orphan; by age 10 he started taking pictures with a box camera. When World War II broke out he was ordered to return to the US, where he reunited with his sisters and joined his high school camera club. Drafted into the war, by June 1944, now a combat infantryman in the 83rd Infantry Division, he was on a boat heading toward Omaha Beach, six days after the first landings at Normandy. Denied access to the Signal Corps, Tony was determined to photograph the war, and had his portable 35mm Argus C-3 with him from the start. For the next 272 days he photographed his personal witness to the brutality of war.

Returning to the US, Tony started his career as a commercial photographer, eventually working for virtually every major publication: Look, Life, Harper’s Bazaar, Town and Country, Newsweek, and many more. Tony went on to become one the most sought after photographers of his day. By focusing on the splendor of life, Tony replaced the images of horror embedded in his eyes from war.

Monroe Gallery of Photography is honored to present a special exhibition celebrating the 99th birthday of this American hero and distinguished photographer. The exhibit of over 40 photographs spans Tony’s 80-year career and features several never-before-exhibited photographs. The exhibit continues on-line and in the Gallery through January 16, 2021.

poster promo of Underfire documentary


Friday, December 10, 2021

Voice of America: 98-Year-Old NYC Photographer Tony Vaccaro Shows Life as Is – From WWII to Today

 

Via Voice of America

December 9, 2021


98-year-old photographer Tony Vaccaro was a simple infantryman, but he unofficially photographed World War II for 272 days. Anna Nelson met with Vaccaro to talk about his role in documenting the war. Anna Rice narrates her story.









Thursday, December 9, 2021

Never before exhibited photographs of Muhammed Ali on display in Austin: Features Gallery Photographer Bob Gomel

 

Never before exhibited photographs of Muhammed Ali on display in Austin

Via CBS Austin

December 9, 2021


The Dolph Briscoe Center for American History at The University of Texas at Austin and the LBJ Presidential Library presents the exhibition “One Night in Miami”: From Photo to Film.


installation photograph of Muhammad Ali exhibit at Briscoe Center

#TBT: Never before exhibited photographs of Muhammed Ali on display in Austin



Located in the LBJ Library’s Great Hall, the exhibit showcases iconic photos from the Briscoe Center’s collections that inspired key moments in the 2020 film.

It features a selection of images from Bob Gomel and Flip Schulke, famed photojournalists whose archives are housed at the Briscoe Center. The photos, many of which have never before been exhibited, depict a young Muhammed Ali (then known by his birth name, Cassius Clay) during the early years of his boxing career.

After his victory over Sonny Liston for the heavyweight championship in Feb. 1964, Ali celebrated with friends and supporters at the Hampton House, a motel in Miami that served as a gathering place for Black entertainers and celebrities.

There, Ali was joined by his friends Malcolm X, singer Sam Cooke, and football player Jim Brown, among others. The gathering inspired Kemp Powers’s 2013 play, “One Night in Miami,” which was adapted into Regina King’s award-winning 2020 movie.


Malcolm X photographs Muhammad Ali at the victory party after Ali’s defeat of Sonny Liston, February 25, 1964. Photograph by Bob Gomel

Malcolm X photographs Muhammad Ali at the victory party after Ali’s defeat of Sonny Liston, February 25, 1964. Photograph by Bob Gomel, Bob Gomel Photographic Archive.


A key scene in the movie recreates Gomel’s photograph of Malcolm X and Ali in the Hampton House diner.

One of the opening scenes of the film was inspired by Flip Schulke’s famous photos of Ali taken in a Miami swimming pool in 1961. The shoot offered Schulke the opportunity to test out his experimental underwater camera setup.

In addition to a selection of rare photos from Gomel and Schulke, the exhibit features equipment from both photographers and related ephemera.

"One Night in Miami”: From Photo to Film runs until May 8, 2022. For more details on the exhibit, please go to: https://briscoecenter.org/exhibitions/one-night-in-miami/


The LBJ Library is open to the public. Admission tickets must be bought online in advance. For details, please go to: https://www.lbjlibrary.org/visit.

In the Gallery with: Sid and Michelle Monroe

 Via 1854 - British Journal of Photography

December 8, 2021


“I think some of the greatest photojournalism contains information that we were never meant to see”


In 1985, Michelle and Sid Monroe sat down with Alfred Eisenstaedt to discuss the possibility of exhibiting the famed LIFE magazine photographer’s work at a Manhattan gallery. Then in his 80s, Eisenstaedt regaled the young couple, then in their 20s and engaged to wed, with stories of an extraordinary life behind the camera. (direct link with slide show)

The Monroes experienced a powerful moment of revelation as Eisenstaedt recounted memories of fascism spreading across Europe and the harrowing realisation he would have to leave Germany to survive. “It was the meeting of a lifetime,” says Sid. “It was remarkable to see this person who had witnessed and photographed history. We were in the presence of something bigger than we had ever encountered before. This is our collective history — we didn’t live this but this is what formed the world we were born into.”

black and wihite photo of US GIs standing in open window of Hitler's retreat in Germany, 1945


Hitler's Window. Germany. 1945 © Tony Vaccaro, courtesy Monroe Gallery of Photography.


The encounter with Eisenstaedt opened their eyes to a new path, one that combined the realms of art, history, and reportage. At a time when photography was still striving to receive proper recognition from the art world, the young couple decided to devote themselves to uplifting, supporting, and preserving the work of photojournalists with the creation of Monroe Gallery in a classic street-level Soho loft on Grand Street. “It was like falling in love,” says Michelle. “It wasn’t a strategic decision that either of us made but more like listening to a piece of music that you were completely moved by.”

Sid concurs. “It became a passion that probably wouldn’t have made any sense if we had thought critically about it, but we decided: this is it. It was a remarkable time. We met many of Eisenstaedt’s colleagues for LIFE, who were all in their 70s or 80s. Although they had retired, they still had offices at the Time-Life Building and were treated like royalty. When we opened our gallery, we thought we hit the jackpot and assumed everyone was going to feel what we feel.”

But in the 1980s, photojournalism wasn’t sexy, it wasn’t conceptual, and although it was reasonably priced, it was a hard sell. At the time, dealers were focused on selling vintage prints, while the Monroes were breaking new ground selling multiples and limited editions. “It was a little bleak in the beginning because people didn’t understand,” Sid says. “But, on the flip side, that allowed us to develop our focus and it became our domain.”


black nd withe photo of Mrs. Cheney hugging young Ben Chaney at James Chaney;'s funeral, 1964

Mrs. Chaney and young Ben. James Chaney funeral. Meridian, Mississippi. 1964 © Bill Eppridge.


After 9/11, the Monroes left downtown Manhattan and headed west, settling in Santa Fe, New Mexico. “It gave us more freedom,” says Michelle. “In New York, you’re always going to be a relatively small gallery and competing for attention. In Santa Fe, you stand out just by doing what you do.” 

Santa Fe living also allows for a distinctive change of pace. “In New York, it’s ‘I’ve got five minutes, show me what you’ve got’,” says Sid. “Here it’s more relaxed. We can sit and talk with collectors — but it’s still a hustle.” 

Indeed, the Monroes have worked diligently over the past 20 years to establish the gallery at the intersection between photojournalism and fine art, showcasing works embedded in our collective consciousness that shape our shared history. The gallery roster includes Bill Ray, Tony Vaccaro, Bill Eppridge, Eddie Adams, Nina Berman, Cornell Capa, Ruth Orkin, and Nina Leen — photographers who not only documented their times but have also transformed the very way we see.

“Eisenstaedt, Carl Mydans, Margaret Bourke-White, Gordon Parks, they taught us how to look at history, and the people we represent are part of the same family tree. Over the past 10, 15 years, we’ve seen more work that has the same visual impact,” says Michelle. The gallery roster has expanded to include more women and artists of colour such as Anna Boyiazis, Gabriela E. Campos, Whitney Curtis, and Sanjay Suchak.

“We are fortunate to have had direct personal relationships with these photographers from the very beginning,” Michelle says. “Initially it’s visual attraction but we’ve learned the consciousness of these photographers and it becomes one and the same with what they are driven to do. To sit across from them and bear witness to what they have seen gives us the motivation to show their work to the world. I think some of the greatest photojournalism contains information that we were never meant to see.”


Tony Vaccaro at 99 is on show at Monroe Gallery until 16 January 2022.



About the author

Miss Rosen is a New York-based writer focusing on art, photography, and culture. Her work has been published in books by Arlene Gottfried, Allan Tannenbaum, and Harvey Stein, as well as magazines and websites including Time, Vogue, Aperture, Dazed, AnOther, and Vice, among others.

Tuesday, December 7, 2021

Ashley Gilbertson's Photographs Featured in Latest NY Times Story on Colbalt Mining

 

December 7, 2021

color photograph from New York Times of Felix Tshisekedi, the Congolese president, top in the gray suit, arrived this spring at the Fleuve Congo Hotel in Kinshasa.

The New York Times published another installment about the Democratic Republic of Congo's mining of  cobalt and other metals used in the production of electric car batteries, wind turbines and other mainstays of the green energy revolution with photographs by Ashley Gilbertson.


On the Banks of the Furious Congo River, a 5-Star Emporium of Ambition

Friday, December 3, 2021

“One Night in Miami”: From Photo to Film Exhibit Features Gallery Photographer Bob Gomel

Via The Briscoe Center for American History 

December 9, 2021 – May 8, 2022

LBJ Presidential  Library and Museum, Austin, Texas 

Great Hall


The LBJ Library is open to the public. Admission tickets must be bought online in advance. For details, please go to https://www.lbjlibrary.org/visit.

“One Night in Miami”: From Photo to Film showcases iconic photos from the Briscoe Center’s collections that inspired key moments in the 2020 film. It features a selection of images from Bob Gomel and Flip Schulke, famed photojournalists whose archives are housed at the Briscoe Center. The photos, many of which have never before been exhibited, depict a young Muhammed Ali (then known by his birth name, Cassius Clay) during the early years of his boxing career.

After his victory over Sonny Liston for the heavyweight championship in Feb. 1964, Ali celebrated with friends and supporters at the Hampton House, a motel in Miami that served as a gathering place for Black entertainers and celebrities. There, Ali was joined by his friends Malcolm X, singer Sam Cooke and football player Jim Brown, among others. The gathering inspired Kemp Powers’s 2013 play, “One Night in Miami,” which was adapted into Regina King’s award-winning 2020 movie. A key scene in the movie recreates Gomel’s photograph of Malcolm X and Ali in the Hampton House diner.

black and white photograph of Malcolm X photographs Muhammad Ali at the victory party after Ali’s defeat of Sonny Liston, February 25, 1964. Photograph by Bob Gomel, Bob Gomel Photographic Archive.

Malcolm X photographs Muhammad Ali at the victory party after Ali’s defeat of Sonny Liston, February 25, 1964. Photograph by Bob Gomel, Bob Gomel Photographic Archive.


One of the opening scenes of the film was inspired by Flip Schulke’s famous photos of Ali taken in a Miami swimming pool in 1961. The shoot offered Schulke the opportunity to test out his experimental underwater camera setup.

In addition to a selection of rare photos from Gomel and Schulke, the exhibit features equipment from both photographers and related ephemera.

Thursday, December 2, 2021

Stephen Wilkes among group of nature photographers joining forces to protect the environment

 

Via CNN

December 2, 2021


color photograph of Serengeti watering place made by blending multiple photographs taken over time

Stephen Wilkes - Serengeti Day to Night. For his project "Day to Night," Stephen Wilkes creates images of landscapes photographed from a fixed camera angle for up to 30 hours. Blending these images into a single photograph can take months. Pictured, is Serengeti National Park, Tanzania.   ©,Stephen Wilkes

View slide show here

The final moments before the death of the last male northern white rhino, a 66-year-old elephant swimming in the ocean, and renowned primatologist Jane Goodall searching for chimpanzees in Tanzania in the early 1960s; these are all moments captured in a collection of powerful photographs that have been donated to raise funds for conservation projects.

Works by 100 photographers from around the world will be sold until the end of the year by Vital Impacts, a non-profit that provides financial support to community-orientated conservation organizations and amplifies the work of photographers who are raising awareness of their efforts. Contributing is a who's who of nature photography, including Paul Nicklen, Ami Vitale, Jimmy Chin, Chris Burkard, Nick Brandt, Beth Moon, Stephen Wilkes and Goodall herself.

"Each image has a really profound story behind it," said Vitale, an award-winning photographer and co-founder of Vital Impacts. "I worked really hard when I was curating this to make sure that these photographers are diverse, but the one thing they all share is this commitment to the planet. They're using their art to help conservation."

'An inspiration to the world'

Goodall's photograph of herself, sitting with a telescope on a high peak in Gombe, Tanzania, was taken around 1962 using a camera that she fastened to a tree branch. "I was pretty proud of myself. I love that picture," said Goodall in a video message for Vital Impacts. All the proceeds from her self-portrait will go to supporting her Roots & Shoots program, which educates young people and empowers them to care for the world.

color photo og Jane Goodall sittng in forest

Jane Goodall's "Self Portrait," from the early 1960s, in Tanzania. Credit: ©,Jane Goodall


"It's breathtaking work," said Vitale, who only found out that Goodall was a photographer after reaching out to her about supporting the program. "She's been such an inspiration to the world. This one woman has had such an impact for the betterment of the planet."

Vital Impacts has tried to make the print sale carbon neutral by planting trees for every print that is made. Sixty per cent of profits from the sale will be divided between four groups involved in wildlife or habitat protection: Big Life Foundation, Great Plains Foundation's Project Ranger, Jane Goodall Institute's Roots & Shoots program, and SeaLegacy. The remaining 40% will go to the photographers to help them continue their work.

'Our shared life raft'

Vitale was a conflict photographer for a decade before becoming a wildlife photographer. She hopes that people will be "inspired by all of this work" and that the photographs make people "fall in love" with our "magnificent planet."

"The planet is our shared life raft and we've poked some holes in it, but it's not too late," added Vitale. "We can all do little acts that can have profound impacts. That's kind of why I named it 'Vital Impacts,' because I think very often we are all so disconnected and don't realize how we are interconnected. Everything we do impacts one another and shapes this world."

One of her photographs in the print sale, "Goodbye Sudan," shows Sudan, the last male northern white rhino, being comforted by one of his keepers, Joseph Wachira, at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in northern Kenya moments before the rhino's death in March 2018. Now, two females are all that remains of this species.


color photo shows moments before death of the last male northern white rhino in 2018.
.
"Goodbye Sudan" by Ami Vitale shows the moments before the death of the last male northern white rhino in 2018. Credit:© Ami Vitale

"It's such an important story to me because it made me realize that watching these animals go extinct is actually like watching our own demise in slow motion, knowing that it's going to impact humanity," said Vitale.

"It's so deeply interwoven. That's what led me down this path and now I really try to find these stories which show us a way forward, where people are learning how to coexist and protect wildlife and the habitats that we all share."

Wednesday, December 1, 2021

Saturday, November 27, 2021

Simone Leluault, one of the heroines of Tony Vaccaro's iconic Kiss of Liberation, has died

 Via New in 24

November 26, 2021

US soldier kissing young girls after liberation of France by Tony Vaccaro

Tony Vaccaro’s famous “Kiss of Liberation”. The young woman seen in the background on the left is Simone Leluault, who died Wednesday, November 24, 2021 © Tony Vaccaro


She embodied Freedom and rediscovered joy. France saved by the Allies and delivered from the Nazis. Simone Leluault passed away on Wednesday November 24, 2021, at the age of 95.

She was one of the dancers of the famous Kiss of Liberation. An image taken by the American war photographer Tony Vaccaro, on August 15, 1944, during the liberation of the small village of Saint-Briac, located near Dinard, in Brittany.

Printed in five million copies

The photo was selected by General Eisenhower as a symbol of American action in Europe during World War II. It was printed in five million copies and distributed throughout the world.


“This photo is almost an accident”

“Oh, you know, this photo is almost an accident,” Tony Vaccaro told us during one of his trips to France 70 years later.

A happy accident dated August 15, 1944. That day, Saint-Briac, liberated by General Patton’s 83rd Infantry Division, was won over by popular jubilation. On the Place du Center, we take out the accordion, a party is improvised. A circle is formed. A man has to go get a woman and the two people have to kiss each other on a mat in the center of the circle. Then it’s the woman’s turn to choose a man and take him to the center mat.

I was in the square, across the street. And there, I recognize this American soldier, my friend Gene Constanzo, crouching and kissing a little girl in the middle of a group of young girls dancing around him


Tony Vaccaro

The power of an image

The GI's crosses the square at full stride. He guessed the strength of the scene. The tenderness and joy carried by this image. The Kiss of Liberation is in the box. Forever.

The next day, I went by jeep to the surroundings of Rennes. I needed a studio and chemicals to develop my photos. The negatives were perfect!

We never knew who the kissed little girl was at the heart of the photo. Tony Vaccaro, on the other hand, has kept in touch all his life with the two young women, in the background. Sisters Marie-Thérèse and Simone Crochu.

70 years later, in front of the famous enlarged photo on the pediment of the town hall of Saint-Briac, the former American war reporter and Simone Leluault faced the crowd, in the presence of John Kerry, then head of American diplomacy, during the inauguration of the “Tony Vaccaro Square”.


Wounded by a shard

Simone had publicly remembered the summer of 1944 when she almost lost her life. She was on a train that had been targeted by an English plane. Wounded by a shard, the 18-year-old young woman had been miraculously saved by a bundle of artichokes that she held against her. “And it wasn’t a leg injury that was going to stop him dancing a few weeks later,” John Kerry had teased from the podium. Simone had answered him with a big smile. That same smile forever imprinted in the history books.



Exhibition: Tony Vaccaro at 99 - November 26, 2021 through January 16, 2022


Friday, November 26, 2021

Tony Vaccaro at Monroe Gallery of Photography

 Via Pasatiempo, The Santa Fe New Mexican

November 26, 2020


color photo of fashion model on NY commuter train, 1960
Tony Vaccaro, The Fashion Train, NYC (1960), archival pigment print


Photographer Tony Vaccaro, the subject of a 2016 documentary by HBO Films, fought on the front lines during World War II as a combat infantryman in the 83rd Infantry Division. All the while he was documenting his first-hand experience with his camera.

After the war, Vaccaro distinguished himself as a photographer, capturing a spectrum of events and personalities, such as artist Georgia O’Keeffe, architect Frank Lloyd Wright, and activist Coretta Scott King. His work appeared in numerous publications, including Harper’s Bazaar, Town and Country, and Newsweek.

Vaccaro, who’s about to turn 99, survived the Battle of Normandy and, more recently, a bout of COVID-19. He appears via live remote for his 99th Birthday Exhibition during a 5 p.m. reception on Friday, Nov. 26. The exhibit continues through Jan. 16. Masks and proof of vaccination required for the reception.

Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar Ave., 505-992-0800, monroegallery.com



Thursday, November 25, 2021

Monroe Gallery of Photography: Tony Vaccaro 99th Birthday Exhibition

screen shot og :'Oiel de la Photographie feature on Tony Vaccaro exhibit



November 25, 2021

In what has become an annual tradition, Monroe Gallery of Photography presents a special exhibition celebrating the birthday of renowned photographer Tony Vaccaro – this year honoring his 99th birthday – on December 20.

The exhibit of over 40 photographs spans Tony’s 80-year career and features several never-before-exhibited photographs. Nearing age 99, Tony Vaccaro is one of the few people alive who can claim to have survived the Battle of Normandy and COVID-19.

As the world has endured nearly two years of the Covid-19 pandemic, the work of Tony Vaccaro serves as an antidote to man’s inhumanity; by focusing on the splendor of life, Tony replaced the images of horror embedded in his eyes from war’. Full post with slide show.


 

Tuesday, November 23, 2021

TONY VACCARO AT 99

 




In what has become an annual tradition, Monroe Gallery of Photography is honored to present a special exhibition celebrating the birthday of renowned photographer Tony Vaccaro – this year honoring his 99th birthday on December 20. The exhibit of over 40 photographs spans Tony’s 80-year career and features several never-before-exhibited photographs. The exhibit opens Friday, November 26, and continues through January 16, 2022. Nearing age 99, Tony Vaccaro is one of the few people alive who can claim to have survived the Battle of Normandy and COVID-19.

As the world has endured nearly two years of the Covid-19 pandemic, the work of Tony Vaccaro serves as an antidote to man’s inhumanity; by focusing on the splendor of life, Tony replaced the images of horror embedded in his eyes from war.

Born in Greensburg, Pennsylvania on December 20, 1922, Tony Vaccaro spent the first years of his life in the village of Bonefro, Italy after his family left America under threat from the Mafia. His mother died during childbirth a few years before tuberculosis claimed his father, and by age 5 he was an orphan in Italy, raised by an uncaring aunt and enduring beatings from an uncle. By World War II he was an American G.I., drafted into the war heading toward Omaha Beach, six days after the first landings at Normandy. Denied access to the Signal Corps, Tony was determined to photograph the war, and had his portable 35mm Argus C-3 with him from the start. For the next 272 days he photographed his personal witness to the brutality of war.

After the war, Tony remained in Germany to photograph the rebuilding of the country for Stars And Stripes magazine. Returning to the US in 1950, Tony started his career as a commercial photographer, eventually working for virtually every major publication: Look, Life, Harper’s Bazaar, Town and Country, Newsweek, and many more. Tony went on to become one the most sought after photographers of his day.


UNDERFIRE: The Untold Story of Tony Vaccaro (trailer). from Cargo Film & Releasing on Vimeo.

Underfire: The Untold Story of PFC Tony Vaccaro is available from Apple and Amazon

 

Saturday, November 20, 2021

Monroe Gallery of Photography was honored to donate a print by Gabriela E. Campos to Christus St. Vincent's Hospital

 

black and white photo of nurses at St. Vincents Covid ward, Santa Fe, NM 2020

On Friday, Nov. 19, Monroe Gallery of Photography was honored to donate a print by Gabriela E. Campos to Christus St. Vincent's Hospital.

"A nursing station in the Frost 19 unit, Christus St. Vincent Regional Medical Center, Santa Fe, NM, December, 2020" was taken during a surge in Covid-10 cases, and was part of a series that resulted in a first place New Mexico Press Association award. View the full essay here in the Santa Fe New Mexican.

Tuesday, November 16, 2021

Photographer Ashley Gilbertson in the HBO Documentary "Four Hours at the Capitol"

 VIA HBO

On Demand - Available until November 25, 2021

Photographer Ashley Gilbertson, who captured the iconic image of Officer Goodman on January 6, recounts his observations in the documentary. Three of Gilbertson's photographs from that day were in the Monroe Gallery exhibit "Present Tense". 


 

Four Hours At The Capitol - Watch the HBO Original Documentary | HBO


Four Hours at the Capitol is an immersive chronicle of the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021, when thousands of American citizens from across the country gathered in Washington D.C. to protest the results of the 2020 presidential election, many with the intent of disrupting the certification of Joe Biden’s presidency. The documentary film is executive produced by Dan Reed (HBO’s Leaving Neverland, Three Days of Terror: The Charlie Hebdo Attacks, Terror at the Mall) and directed by Jamie Roberts.

‌‌Tightly focused on the facts of the day itself, the documentary features never-before-seen footage and vivid first-hand accounts from lawmakers, staffers, police officers, protesters, and rioters who stormed the Capitol building where the electoral votes were being counted. The film details how the violence quickly escalated, leaving Capitol security forces outnumbered and overwhelmed, and highlights the high-stakes standoff between police and rioters. Four Hours at the Capitol presents an unfiltered look at the insurrection, standing both as an intimate recollection as well as a stark reminder of the wider ramifications of the events of that unprecedented day, which ended with the deaths of five people and more than 140 police officers injured.

Three of Gilbertson's photographs from that day were in the Monroe Gallery exhibit "Present Tense". 

Monday, November 15, 2021

Gallery Photographers Margaret Bourke-White and Alfred Eisenstaedt Included in “Masters of Photography" Exhibit

 

Via The San Diego Union Tribune

November 14, 2021


"Finally opening one year after its scheduled debut, the San Diego Museum of Art’s new photography exhibition will display some of the medium’s most recognizable and influential names, including Ansel Adams, Dorothea Lange, Aaron Siskind and Alfred Eisenstaedt.

“Things as They Are: City, Society and Conflict” covers everything from a chilling shot of Nazi minister of propaganda Joseph Goebbels by Alfred Eisenstaedt in 1933. Two of Bourke-White’s prints are on view in the “Things as They Are: City, Society and Conflict” section. One is a 1951 image of the U.S. Navy aircraft carrier Boxer, stationed in San Diego, the other is of the Buchenwald concentration camp liberation in 1945. "

Saturday, November 13, 2021

Ed Kashi: ‘This image was a breakthrough. I began to see the world anew’

 Via The Guardian

By Grace Holliday

Sat 13 November,  2021 


Sky high: Ed Kashi’s best phone picture

‘This image was a breakthrough. I began to see the world anew’

view of gondolas on Santa Cruz boardwalk
Santa Cruz boardwalk, 2013, shot on iPhone 5. Photograph: Ed Kashi

Ed Kashi regards his shot of a California aerial tram ride as a personal turning point. For three decades, on assignment in countries including Nigeria, Iraq and Pakistan, he had taken countless images of civil discord and extreme suffering. “I had absorbed that trauma – many photojournalists do. Often our singular goal is to get as close as possible to the most horrible things on Earth and document them,” Kashi says. “I needed to rehabilitate myself, to make a photo that was soft, beautiful and candy-coloured – to expand my emotional range. This image was a breakthrough. I began to see the world anew.”

Kashi describes this period as the “Plasticine era of Instagram”, a time when the smartphone was transitioning from “a fun, novelty toy to a viable tool for an image maker”.

The shot was taken at an amusement park in the US city of Santa Cruz on a day trip with college students, during the afternoon session of a photography workshop Kashi was conducting. “When I’m ‘on’ as a photojournalist, I’m always looking for and responding to visual clues, whether it’s the horizon or the light,” he says.

Spontaneously boarding the aerial tram, he reached for his iPhone 5 instead of his usual 35mm camera. Even in an amusement park dedicated to pleasure and fun, he saw darker undercurrents (not least the plastic figure taking a ride). “The people in the shot aren’t beaming,” he says. “Their facial expressions suggest that perhaps they’re hungry, or tired, or just had a fight. That’s just being human.” And, as the cabin rose, a thought he’d had in far more serious contexts urged him on: “The photo gods have bestowed this upon me – don’t screw it up.”


View more of Ed Kashi's photography here

Sunday, November 7, 2021

Gallery Photographer Sanjay Suchak: "There's no better example of democracy and photography than the statue removals happening around Virginia"

 

Via VPM Instagam

November 7, 2021

Gallery photographer Sanjay Suchak's "Take 'em Down" series covering the removal of confederate statues in Virginia as the only official photographer allowed to be part of the wrecking crew was featured on Virginia Public Media (VPM). His work was featured in Monroe Gallery's "Present Tense" exhibit earlier this summer.

photo of crane removing statue of Andrew Jackson in Richmond, VA, 2020


"There's no better example of democracy and photography than the statue removals happening around Virginia. I've always liked documenting construction - more destruction of things, abandoned buildings, tearing down arenas, places filled with such life that you tear down piece by piece. So the idea of dismantling these statues, which are celebrated at some point, for all the wrong reasons is very attractive to me as a photographer.”

- Sanjay Suchak





Tuesday, November 2, 2021

We look forward to exhibiting and seeing you in New York! Save the dates: The Photography Show presented by AIPAD, May 19 through 22, 2022, at Center415

 



VIA AIPAD

NEW YORK – The Association of International Photography Art Dealers (AIPAD) has announced new dates and a new midtown Manhattan location for The Photography Show presented by AIPAD. The highly anticipated 41th edition will be held from May 19 through 22, 2022, at Center415 located on Fifth Avenue between 37th and 38th streets in New York City.  


More than 45 of the world’s leading galleries of fine art photography will present museum-quality work including cutting-edge contemporary, modern, and exemplary 19th-century photographs, as well as photo-based art, video, and new media, at the premier fine art photography fair. 

“After an absence of almost three years due to COVID-19, we can’t wait to reunite the global photography community in New York City for The Photography Show presented by AIPAD,” said Michael Lee, President of AIPAD and Owner of Lee Gallery, Winchester, Mass. “There is a great desire for photography dealers, collectors, curators and museum groups to finally gather again in front of the best in photography. We look forward to presenting a tightly focused member fair in a fresh venue in the middle of Manhattan and with dates that place AIPAD in the exciting art calendar in May.” 

The Photography Show, a vital part of New York City’s cultural scene and a must-see among fine art photography collectors, is the longest running exhibition dedicated to the photographic medium. The 2022 Show will feature leading galleries – all of whom are members of AIPAD – from across the U.S. and around the world, including Europe, Asia, Canada, and South America. 

An essential annual event for the international photography community, The Photography Show presented by AIPAD commences with an Opening Preview on Thursday, May 19. 

SHOW LOCATION
Center415, 415 Fifth Avenue, between 37th and 38th Streets, New York City
For further details, visit aipad.com or contact info@aipad.com.

MEDIA INFORMATION ONLINE
Information about The Photography Show presented by AIPAD is available at aipad.com. Find AIPAD on Facebook at facebook.com/AIPADphoto or follow @AIPADphoto on Instagram and Twitter.

AIPAD BACKGROUND
Founded in 1979, The Association of International Photography Art Dealers (AIPAD) represents more than 80 of the world’s leading galleries in fine art photography. AIPAD is dedicated to creating and maintaining the highest standards of scholarship and ethical practice in the business of exhibiting, buying, and selling fine art photography. More information is available at AIPAD.com.

Sunday, October 31, 2021

Gallery Photographer Gabriela Campos Receives 2 New Mexico Press Awards

October 31, 2021

Via The Santa Fe New Mexican


 The New Mexico Press Association recognized the best of New Mexico’s newspaper writing, photography and advertising at the Better Newspaper Contest Banquet on Saturday.

The Santa Fe New Mexican captured 24 first-place honors and 18 second-place finishes and was the winner of the General Excellence award Saturday night in the New Mexico Press Association’s Better Newspaper Contest.

The contest honors work in all aspects of a news platform, including website and advertising content. The New Mexican competes in the largest category, daily newspapers with a circulation above 11,000. Journalists from throughout the state received their awards at a banquet Saturday night at Santa Fe’s Eldorado Hotel.

“In one of the most difficult years ever faced by newspapers, I’m so proud of the work our staff produced,” said New Mexican Publisher Tom Cross. “The General Excellence award is the mark of effort, dedication and talent across our entire newsroom and with our advertising staff. We’re proud of every member of our team.”

Photo Series: First Place, Gabriela Campos

Online Photo Gallery: First Place, Gabriela Campos

Tuesday, October 19, 2021

A Nation of Neglect: 'Devour The Land' Special Exhibition

 

Via The Harvard Crimson

By Ebubechi J. Nwaubani, Contributing Writer

October 19, 2021

On Sept. 17, The Harvard Art Museum opened its doors to the new “Devour the Land” photography exhibition. The showing is divided into three rooms and travels through the ramifications of nuclear war, environmental poisoning, and urbanization in six parts titled: “Arming America” Part 1 and Part 2, “Slow Violence,” “Regeneration,” “Other Battlefields,” and “Resistance.”

According to curator Makeda Best, “Devour the Land” originates from General William Tecumseh Sherman’s description of a devastated and desolate land following the Union Army’s “scorched earth” policy during the Civil War. Images captured by photographer George Barnard, who accompanied General Sherman on this campaign, depicted “destruction with a certain beauty,” according to Best. This tragic beauty is a thread throughout the three rooms — and a sentiment shared by attendees.

“It’s quite deep, and unfortunately, sad, but there’s also a beauty,” said security guard Patricia A. Daly while standing in front of a series of photos by influential photographer Richard Misrach. In the center of a sun bleached landscape stands a yellow school bus ravaged by nuclear weapons and rot; the photograph is labeled “School Bus Target.”

Disparities within the artwork scenes were picked up by other onlookers as well. Visitor Michael E. Halwes said “The pieces that have really contrasted the war on terror aspects of the Gulf War were pretty compelling and then also the ones where you get a good juxtaposition of the industrial masking [of] the audience's view of the nature behind it.”

This contrast is most prominent in Frederica Armstrong’s photo series “In Plain Site.” Armstrong captures suburban areas of Silicon Valley in her series, areas which have an aura of the mundane: and parking lot, a street corner at sunset. Below each image is the corresponding EPA classification number that identifies it as a superfund site. “The National Priorities List creates lists of sites that are so toxic as to need a superfund [which is] a fusion of federal dollars to clean up and kind of get it under control,” says Best, waving finger quotations in the air around the words “clean up.” Below two images read “Site ready for use: No.”

In a glass box in the center of one of the rooms of the exhibit lies a card titled “Nuclear Mail” with the date August, 1982 in the top left corner. The card reads: “WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Postal Service officials revealed plans to assure mail delivery in the event of nuclear war. … Should Washington D.C. be destroyed, the national postal service will be run from Memphis, Tenn. If Memphis is also devastated, San Bruno Calif. will take over.” Best touches on these effects, saying that “the military is the number one polluter in the country.” Best spoke to the exhaustion of resources done by the scorched earth policy. “We’re still doing that, we’re using up our land, but we’re only poisoning ourselves. We’re only destroying ourselves this time.”

The exhibit stands out from most atomic photography presentations in that it addresses the long term effects of this war on land. Best credits “Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor” by Rob Nixon as her inspiration for the third section of the exhibit “Slow Violence.” Best says the book makes “recognition of violence as attritional versus spectacular.” A series of photographs depict an area in Louisiana known as Cancer Alley, which has one of the largest concentrations of petrochemical plants and refineries in the nation. Most citizens of the area are descendants of slaves. Best addresses the question of geographical racism thoroughly throughout the exhibit. One frame depicts the bright lights of a penitentiary — whose prisoners are disproportionately black — against a pitch black sky. In response, Best says “Many prisons in the country are superfund sites, so what does that mean?”

This exhibition, as much great art does, asks the question: “What’s next?” Attendee Micheal E. Hawles admits that he feels pessimism about the future but says, “People have a responsibility to bear witness to what’s going on in the world around them. … There’s always the chance that someone is going to be exposed to new information and I think it's just about the constant drumming of building public sentiment against these sorts of practices that, ideally, get reflected in policy changes.”

Attendee Ashley M. Kelley was also emotionally impacted by the exhibit. “It's important to take note, [that] even though you aren’t able to see what’s around you, and if you’re privileged enough, know that this is still going on and health hazards have large effects on families and generations,” says Kelley.

It’s clear that the issue of nuclear warfare is not a linear one, but one with many starting points and stories that run parallel to each other throughout history. This exhibition stands as a testament to these parallel stories and, hopefully, points towards an end to such damaging practices.


Monroe Gallery photographers Nina Berman and Ashley Gilbertson are contributors to this exhibition.

Tuesday, October 12, 2021

Anna Boyiazis: Global Peace Photo Award Exhibition

 Via Willy-Brandt-Haus

© Anna Boyiazis color photograph of young women learning to swim in  Indian Ocean off of Muyuni, Zanzibar

© Anna Boyiazis, Global Peace Photo Award

Fr., 01. Oktober 2021 12:00 Uhr bis So., 24. Oktober 2021 18:00 Uhr


GLOBAL PEACE PHOTO AWARD

The Global Peace Photo Award recognizes and promotes photographers from all over the world whose images capture the human quest for a peaceful world and the search for the beautiful and good in our lives. The prize goes to those photographs that best express the idea that our future lies in peaceful coexistence. 


Ausstellung im Willy-Brandt-Haus | 1. Oktober - 24. Oktober 2021 | Öffnungszeiten: Dienstag - Sonntag 12:00 - 20:00 Uhr

Zutritt nur mit Zeitfensterticket, keine Tageskasse vor Ort.

Kostenlose Online-Tickets ab sofort HIER

Der Global Peace Photo Award würdigt und fördert Fotograf:innen aus aller Welt, deren Bilder das menschliche Streben nach einer friedlichen Welt und die Suche nach dem Schönen und Guten in unserem Leben festhalten. Der Preis geht an jene Fotografien, die am besten die Idee zum Ausdruck bringen, dass unsere Zukunft im friedlichen Miteinander liegt.  

Die 25-köpfige Jury des Global Peace Photo Award kürt seit 2013 die besten Friedensbilder. Den Vorsitz 2020 hatte der französische Fotograf Pascal Maitre, 2021 wurde die Jury vom UNESCO-Diplomaten Eric Falt geleitet. Das Peace Image of the Year 2020 heißt „Love Story“ und kommt aus der Hand des iranischen Fotografen Sasan Moayyedi: Nachdem der damals 15-jährige Salah Saeedpour 2001 in der iranisch-kurdischen Provinz Marivan nahe der Grenze zum Irak auf eine Landmine trat, verlor er mehrere Körperteile. Trotzdem trainierte er unerschöpflich und wurde schließlich mit zahlreichen Medaillen im Schwimmen ausgezeichnet. 2014 heiratete er die Liebe seines Lebens. 

Das Children Peace Image of the Year 2020 ist das Foto “Flight of the Soul” und wurde von der 14-jährigen Anastasiya Bolshakova aufgenommen. Die junge Russin hat eine Liebeserklärung an den Sommer fotografiert. An die Zeit, in der - wovon sie überzeugt ist - „alles lebt“ und „die Natur aus voller Brust atmet“.  

Die Gewinner:innen des Contests 2021 werden am 21. September gekürt.  


View Anna Boyiazis' Finding Freedom in the Water fine art print collection here.




 


 


 

Thursday, October 7, 2021

Visualizing the scale of loss to Covid-19

Via CNBC 

October 5, 2021

National Geographic reporter Stephen Wilkes describes his photographic attempt to capture the loss caused of life during the Covid-19 pandemic




Tuesday, October 5, 2021

‘It is becoming unbearable:’ Journalists say they have become ‘scapegoats’ at anti-vaccine protests

 Via Committee to Protect Journalists

October 4, 2021



Journalists covering demonstrations against COVID-19 countermeasures have been called “terrorists,” “pedophiles,” “murderers,” and “scumbags.” Protesters have harassed and assaulted members of the press, and told them that “the nooses are ready.”

Threats like these have become increasingly familiar for reporters in Europe and the United States, where the U.S. Press Freedom Tracker, a CPJ partner, has recorded threats and assaults against reporters in cities including Los Angeles and Portland, Oregon

Full report here - “Being a journalist has always meant a certain level of risk,” Ambrožič said, “but the level of anxiety and stress due to the threats have increased enormously and it is becoming unbearable. It is a very harsh world for journalists, right now.”


Monday, October 4, 2021

Artist Panel: Devour the Land: War and American Landscape Photography since 1970 with Ashley Gilbertson

 

Via Harvard Art Museums

Tuesday, October 5, 2021

4-5 PM Eastern



In this virtual panel discussion, curator Makeda Best will be in conversation with photographers Terry Evans, Ashley Gilbertson, and Will Wilson, each of whom has works in our latest special exhibition, Devour the Land: War and American Landscape Photography since 1970. The exhibition is on view at the Harvard Art Museums through January 16, 2022.

Devour the Land explores the unknown and often hidden consequences of militarism on habitats and well-being in the United States. Featuring approximately 160 photographs across 6 thematic groupings, the exhibition reveals the nationwide footprint of the U.S. military, the wide network of industries that support and supply its work, and the impacts of—and responses to—this activity.

Speakers:

Makeda Best, Richard L. Menschel Curator of Photography, Division of Modern and Contemporary Art, Harvard Art Museums
Terry Evans, Ashley Gilbertson, and Will Wilson, Photographers

This panel discussion will take place online via Zoom. The event is free and open to all, but registration is required. To register, please complete this online form.

Please read these instructions on how to join a meeting on Zoom. For general questions, email am_register@harvard.edu.

Sunday, October 3, 2021

Devour the Land: An Introduction with Curator Makeda Best and commentary from photographers Nina Berman, Sharon Stewart, and Robert Del Tredici

Via Harvard Art Museums  




Curator Makeda Best, alongside commentary from photographers Nina Berman, Sharon Stewart, and Robert Del Tredici, provides a brief introduction to our new special exhibition, Devour the Land: War and American Landscape Photography since 1970. Featuring approximately 160 photographs from 60 artists, the exhibition invites you to explore the impacts of military activity on the American landscape—and how photography supports activism in response to these effects.

Make your reservation to visit the Harvard Art Museums today.