Saturday, November 12, 2011

"We Are Journalists"

I have known what I wanted to do since I was 17. Since then, I have been shot at by the police, I have run from them so that they wouldn’t confiscate my cameras. I have been punched, spit on, yelled at and threatened while doing my job. I love what I do and think I have never worked a day in my life. I am distrustful of authority. I loathe being referred to as a papparazi. I can count on one hand the number of celebrities I have photographed. I hate taking pictures of people like that. My job has taken me to Central America, the Middle East, and all over the United States. Since most of America does not like to go to places like Mississippi post-Hurricane Katrina (or even the bad neighborhoods in their own city), I choose to go for them, so that they might see the condition of their fellow man. People always talk of the sacrifices that journalists make. It isn’t a sacrifice; it is a choice. I chose this path in life, and still choose it, for better or worse. I believe that my camera is a powerful tool to combat injustice. Some of my pictures, in a small way, helped shut down a reform school where children were being abused. I will be proud of that for the rest of my life. I am now 30. I hope I am still doing this in some capacity when I am 60. Hopefully by that time I can afford to move out of my garage apartment.
I am a newspaper photojournalist.



We just discovered a great new Tumblr blog, "We Are Journalists". Happy to recommend.

"I have known what I wanted to do since I was 17. Since then, I have been shot at by the police, I have run from them so that they wouldn’t confiscate my cameras. I have been punched, spit on, yelled at and threatened while doing my job. I love what I do and think I have never worked a day in my life. I am distrustful of authority. I loathe being referred to as a papparazi. I can count on one hand the number of celebrities I have photographed. I hate taking pictures of people like that. My job has taken me to Central America, the Middle East, and all over the United States. Since most of America does not like to go to places like Mississippi post-Hurricane Katrina (or even the bad neighborhoods in their own city), I choose to go for them, so that they might see the condition of their fellow man. People always talk of the sacrifices that journalists make. It isn’t a sacrifice; it is a choice. I chose this path in life, and still choose it, for better or worse. I believe that my camera is a powerful tool to combat injustice. Some of my pictures, in a small way, helped shut down a reform school where children were being abused. I will be proud of that for the rest of my life. I am now 30. I hope I am still doing this in some capacity when I am 60. Hopefully by that time I can afford to move out of my garage apartment.

I am a newspaper photojournalist."